Lost Album

Huna Sounds

We’re all forgetful creatures. While being stuck listening to music in the algorithmic cycle of our preferred streaming service, we tend to lose our most essential albums from sight. But forgetting enables rediscovery. That’s why every month, we ask someone to meditate profoundly and dig through their crates or dusty hard drives to look for an album worth revitalising. This month we asked Tomas Raeymaekers, one-fourth of new music collective Huna Sounds, to recover an album that touched the heart but was forgotten over time.

Words and selection
by Tomas Raeymaekers

 

Which album would you like us to discover?
The Os Brazões self-titled album.

When did you first listen to it?
Some years ago I discovered it in a second-hand record store in Amsterdam. The name of the band reminded me of the Tropicálialegends Os Mutantes. Back home I discovered I was lucky because it wasn’t only the name that showed comparisons but they were indeed part of the Tropicália movement in Brazil. In fact, they was the backing band of Gal Costa & Tom Zé for a while.

I picked a Tropicália record because it reminds me a lot of the modern stuff we spin & book with Huna Sounds

Why do you want to recover this album?
I could have picked any (good) Tropicália record (Os Mutantes, Jorge Ben, Caetano Veloso,…) but this one is a bit lesser known. I picked a Tropicália record because it reminds me a lot of the modern stuff we spin & book with Huna Sounds: the tropicalistas tried to create a new sound with the music that was already around (psychedelic Western pop and the popular music in Brazil at that time). It was a revolting sound: they upset the left wing cultural highbrow class with their too Western sound (and guitars!) but even more the right-wing military ruling army. A lot of the lyrics were metaphors to escape censorship: Veloso and Ben, for instance, were imprisoned and banned from their country. They even switched off Chico Buarques microphone in the middle of a concert. It’s also a sound that never wears down; David Byrne, Nirvana & Beck adored it. Some of the songs got drum and bass versions in the beginning of this century and even today it still sounds fresh.

For fans of?
All psychedelic, revolting music.

What’s your favourite song on the album? 

It’s a sound that never wears down; David Byrne, Nirvana & Beck adored it

Why?
There are a lot of covers on this record, but that was pretty normal for the Tropicália bands. The debut record of Os Mutantes, for example, had only three original songs on it. This one, ‘Carolina Carol Bela’ is originally a song by Toquinho and Jorge Ben.

 

Huna Sounds:
Dengue Dengue Dengue
+ Max Le Daron
May 24th in DOK, Ghent
This show is free for members. Join here.